致舞者,

 

On behalf of the Dance Parade Board, Steering Committee and the broader dance community we serve, I convey our deepest condolences to the families of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDadde, Christian Cooper, David McAtee and countless other victims of injustice everywhere.

 

Dance Parade plays a critical role condemning racial injustice and hate. By presenting as many cultural dances as possible, our work seeks to advance cultural equity, celebrate diversity and inclusion for all people — not just those who are privileged by structural inequities or the color of their skin.

 

As we recognize #BlackOutTuesday today please take a moment to educate yourself on these issues and consider supporting one or more of the non-profit organizations below who are fighting to change the structural racism that surrounds us.

 

In solidarity,
Greg Miller
执行董事

 

 

NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund is the country’s top legal firm fighting for racial justice. Through litigation, advocacy, and public education, it seeks structural changes to expand democracy, eliminate disparities, and achieve justice for all. It also defends the gains and protections won over the past 75 years of civil rights struggle.

 

Poor People’s Campaign confronts the interlocking evils of systemic racism, poverty, and militarism. As a nation we are at a critical juncture — and we need a movement led by working people that will shift the moral narrative, impact policies and elections at every level of government, and build lasting power for poor and impacted people.

 

Color of Change is the nation’s largest online racial justice organization that helps people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by 1.7 million members, they move decision-makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people in America.

 

The Citizenship Education Fund, founded by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, is working to protect, defend and gain civil rights by leveling the economic and educational playing fields while promoting peace and justice around the world. It is a multi-racial, multi-issue, progressive organization that is dedicated to improving the lives of all people by serving as a voice for the voiceless.

 

Mijente is a national hub for Latinx and Chincanx organizing that advocates on behalf of those communities as well as other oppressed communities. It has been leading the charge within Spanish language media, attempting to bring awareness and solidarity with Black-led protests and organizations. It serves as a link between many Black-led organizations and Spanish-speaking communities, participating and leading in solidarity actions in several states.

 

The Bail Project is a national nonprofit organization that pays bail for people in need, reuniting families and restoring the presumption of innocence. In fighting mass incarceration, they aim to secure freedom for as many people as possible and ensure equal justice for all.

 

These groups are doing important work in communities all across the country, and now more than ever they are counting on our support.

    
 
 
#TheShowMustBePaused #BlackOutTuesday  #BlackLivesMatter
#DanceWithoutBorders #DanceParadeNYC
Dance Parade is a 501(c)3 Non-Profit Organization

5月16日星期六,【第14届纽约舞蹈嘉年华 · 巡游及狂欢】将在线上如期举行!舞蹈嘉年华欢迎所有人从世界任何角落加入参与。

和数千位专业的、不专业的舞蹈人一起,随着DJ的节奏扭起来。还有热爱舞蹈的你、我、他,年轻的、年老的、中年的,全都在网上汇聚一堂,点击这里注册。

“像‘傻瓜’一样跳舞的重要性”听起来可能有些奇怪,但是这个视频里所讲述的概念不妨一看!

Responding to the Census

The 2020 Census is happening now. You can complete your questionnaire online, by phone, or by mail.

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Your Invitation To Respond

The time is now. Help shape your future, and your community’s future, by responding to the 2020 Census.

Most households received their invitation to respond to the 2020 Census between March 12 – 20. These official Census Bureau mailings will include detailed information and a Census ID for completing the Census online.

In addition to an invitation to respond, some households will receive a paper questionnaire (sometimes known as the census form). You do not need to wait for your paper questionnaire to respond to the Census.

The 2020 Census is for everyone.

Please complete your form online, by phone, or by mail when your invitation to respond arrives. Visit my2020census.gov to begin.

How To Respond

The 2020 Census will ask a few simple questions about you and everyone who is or will be living with you on April 1, 2020.

For the first time, you can choose to complete the census online, by phone, or by mail. Find out more about each of these methods below:

Please note that if you are responding online, you must complete the census in one sitting, as you don’t have the ability to save your progress. See the questions the census asks here.

If you do not receive an invitation to respond from the Census Bureau, you may respond online or visit our 联系我们 page to call our phone line.

Who Should Respond

The 2020 Census counts everyone living in the United States and its five territories (Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands).

One person should respond for each home. That person must be at least 15 years old. They should live in the home or place of residence themselves and know general information about each person living there. (For more information, visit Questions Asked.)

Please note: If you live in American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, or the U.S. Virgin Islands, the process for completing the census will be 100% paper-based and led by Census takers. Visit Counting the Island Areas for more information.

Everyone Counts

The Census Bureau has specific operations and processes in place to count everyone, including those in group living situations such as college dorms, nursing homes, military barracks, and prisons.

Who Should Be Counted and Where?

You should be counted where you are living and sleeping most of the time as of April 1, 2020. If you are responding for your home, count everyone who lives and sleeps there most of the time as of April 1, 2020. This includes young children, foster children, roommates, and any family members or friends who are living with you, even temporarily.

Please note that if someone is staying with you temporarily on April 1 due to the COVID-19 situation, they should be counted where they usually live. This includes college students, who should still be counted at school, even if they are home early because of the COVID-19 situation. If they live in student housing, the college will count them. If they live off campus, they should respond for the off-campus address and include any roommates or other people living there.

If someone is staying with you on April 1 who doesn’t have a usual home elsewhere, please include them in your response.

People in some living situations—including students, service members, and people in health care facilities—may have questions about how to respond or where they should count themselves. You may also have questions if you are moving, have multiple residences, or have no permanent address.

For more information, please visit Who to Count.

Language Support

You can complete the census online or by phone in 13 different languages: English, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Russian, Arabic, Tagalog, Polish, French, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, and Japanese.

In addition, bilingual invitations and paper questionnaires in English and Spanish will be sent to select areas of the country.

To help you respond, the Census Bureau also offers webpages and guides in 59 non-English languages, including American Sign Language, as well as guides in Braille and large print. Visit Language Support to learn more.

In each issue of our STEPS! E-Newsletter we try to cast the Spotlight on one of our awesome team members to find out more about where they came from and to suss out their connection to dance and supporting the Dance Parade team.  In this issue, we put the spotlight on Dori Garcia.

Hi Dori, Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk with us!

How did you first find out about Dance Parade?

I found out through my partner who was taking a Cuban Salsa Class with the organization’s director, Greg Miller.

 

What is your current role in Dance Parade New York?  

I am the Team Coordinator and Project Manager. I basically work with all the committee chairs to place prospective team members. We are seeking over 200 this year so I’m looking forward to the challenge!

 

What is your favorite style of dance to watch? to participate in?   
I love the latin dances.   Tango is one of the most expressive dances I know and when I see it, I just get wowed!

 

What is your background or interest in dance?

I was raised in Alicante, Spain and have been practicing salsa on and off since I was five year’s old.  I would go with my Aunti in Spain and do my own steps on the side. I also learned contemporary after school and now take bachata classes here in NYC.

 

If you could share the stage with anyone in history, famous or not, living or deceased, a trained dancer or not, performing a routine choreographed by yourself…who would it be?  

I just absolutely love Ataca Y la Alemana, bachatta dancers.

 

Last year we celebrated the theme “Movement of the People” What does this year’s theme “Dance Without Borders ” mean to you?   

I think Dance Without Borders demonstrates that it doesn’t matter where you come from or what your abilities/capabilities are—There are no limitations in order to dance and you can still share your passion to dance.

 

What dance group or dance style are you most looking forward to seeing this coming year in the parade? 

I can’t wait to see the Cuban Rueda salsa.  At the Dance Parade event “Winter’s Eve” at Columbus Circle,  I saw Fuakata Cuban Ensemble choreographed and led by Chris Rojecki and they were just amazing.

 

If you could choose Grand Marshal for next year’s parade….who would it be?  

I would love to see Shakira because she’s so passionate and helps others through her charity work.

 

If you could pick another country to hold a Dance Parade and Festival….which would it be?

Definetely Spain!

 

Working for a nonprofit organization can at times be daunting and frustrating with limited personnel and funding….what is it that keeps you coming back for more and more? 

I had heard about Dance Parade before I came to New York and since I’m passionate about dance, it’s just amazing to me that I’m a part of an organization that allows us to express ourselves–and we do it in my favorite form–Dancing!

 

What pitch would you use to attract a new volunteer onto the Dance Parade team?

It’s a great opportunity to do something that makes a difference for so many people.  And it’s a lot of fun and we put it all together in such a positive way—A lot of work but so worth it!

本周网上舞蹈课程

“Team Work Makes the Dream Work” and Dance Parade relies on our six member Board of Directors to provide oversight and leadership for our non-profit organization.

Members of the Board have a legal and ethical responsibility to ensure that the organization does the best work possible in pursuit of its goals.

The Steering Committee, Volunteers and the broader dance community we serve are grateful for your support!

一起跳舞,一起沸腾!

There’s nowhere in the world where there is a culture that doesn’t move to music. This video presents research about the Collective Effervescence of dance and helps explain why there is so much joy in the air when 10,000 dancers come together in the Annual Dance Parade and Festival.

 

This video explains why dance has become a human necessity in the gluing of societies together:

 

 

The French sociologist Émile Durkheim (1858-1917) theorised that ‘collective effervescence’ — moments in which people come together in some form of unifying, excitement-inducing activity — is at the root of what holds groups together. More recently, Dr. Bronwyn Tarr, an evolutionary biologist and psychologist at the University of Oxford who is also a trained dancer, has researched the evolutionary and neurological underpinnings of our innate tendency to bust a move.

Photo credit: Miguel Chavez

 

Drawing on the work of both Durkheim and Tarr, this Aeon Original video explores that unifying feeling of group ‘electricity’ that lifts us up when we’re enthralled by our favourite sports teams, participating in religious rituals, entranced by music – and, yes, dancing together at the Annual Dance Parade New York.

You can read more about Durkheim and his work here 通过网络参加 about Dr. Tarr’s work here.

 

 

 

The Annual Dance Parade, with over 100 unique forms of dance, is an accelerator of Collective Effervescence, gluing society together.

 

 

Photo credit: Glenmore-Marshall

One hypothesis is that it provides an opportunity for people to come together, making them move — dance — and in doing so we experience internal hormonal cascades which are made up of ‘feel good’ chemicals. These bursts of chemicals are part of our brain’s pain and pleasure and reward circuitry, and when they are triggered they provide an experience of elation and positive reward. When we get this kick in the presence of others, the result is that of collective joy — positive, shared experiences through which we establish and maintain important social connections with others. Now we feel like we belong to a unified, cohesive whole.

 

Being part of a cohesive social group would have been really important for our ancestors — collaborating with others to find shelter, hunt, rear young would have increased our chances of survival. Music and dance are by no means the only ways we can stimulate these positive social ‘highs’. But they’re really good ways of doing it because it’s an experience that we can share with lots of people at once. In order to understand why that would have given us such a great advantage we need to look at our species in the context of primates.

 

Photo Credit: Chris Fernando

 

 

 

Get Social with Dance Parade on:
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Learn more about our friends at Aeon

 

In each issue of our STEPS! Newsletter we try to cast the Spotlight on one of our awesome team members to find out more about where they came from and to suss out their connection to dance and supporting the Dance Parade team.  In this issue, we put the spotlight on Rebecca Myles.

Hi, Rebecca.  Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk with us.

 

How did you first find out about Dance Parade? 

I first came across DanceFest as it’s held in Tompkins Square Park and I live close by. Performing on stage was a salsa group where this rather senior dancer suddenly flipped his partner upwards and twirled her around his neck. My mouth dropped open in wonder and then admiration at his skill and stamina. I was riveted to the spot, wondering “what is this?” and got hooked into Dance Parade.

 

What is your current role in Dance Parade New York?

Head of Publicity. We aim to make sure as many New Yorkers know about the parade through listings and pre-parade interviews and coverage, and then on the day coverage.

Every year we host a press conference at City Hall during the week leading up to the parade. The upcoming one is Wednesday May 15th at 2pm.  We will receive a Proclamation from the City which declares the coming Saturday as Dance Parade Day. It is a charming tradition and the Proclamation is beautiful. I am always intrigued by the inventive ways the Mayor describes the Parade and DanceFest.

The New York press are very generous to us and we’ve been featured over the years on NY1, New York Times, New York Daily News, New York Post, Wall Street Journal, New Yorker, Time Out, Gothamist, AMNY, The Villager, 1010 WINS, WABC, WBAI, Univision, to name but a few.

 

What is your favorite style of dance to watch? to participate in? 

I love watching all kinds of dance because it transports me to a heartfelt space for experiencing an emotional “movement” story. Most recently I attended a lecture by Catherine Turocy, Director of New York Baroque Dance, which included demonstrations of Baroque dance styles. It was exquisite and what struck me was the intimacy of couples dancing and the inevitable poetry of two bodies in motion knitted by hand and eye touches. The evening was organized by NYU’s La Maison Francaise.

The last dancing I did was on Jeannie Hoppers’ Liquid Sound Lounge “Disco” boat. She has another name for it but that’s how I encourage friends to come. My friend Jenny always turns up as she understands the sheer brilliance of dancing on the East River against a backdrop of a New York skyline with Jeannie on the turntables, and live musicians.

 

 

What is your dance background or interest in dance? 

I remember wanting to do ballet as a kid but that didn’t happen. I suspect there was no extra cash. I had lots of excess energy even after climbing trees and biking everywhere so perhaps I saw dance as a channel, a home. I did ballroom dancing in college, and always went clubbing. I loved the free jazz dance floor downstairs at the Rock City in Nottingham. When I got to New York it was off to Nell’s, the Bank, Palladium, Robots…and for a while I took dance lessons in swing, African…but with pairing dances too often I land in trouble wanting to lead all the time.

 

If you could share the stage with anyone in history famous or not, living or deceased, a trained dancer or not, performing a routine choreographed by yourself…who would it be? 

Bob Fosse – because he understood the erotic and ascendant power dance.

 

 

Last year we celebrated the repeal of the Cabaret Law with the theme “The Cabaret of Life” — What does this year’s theme “Movement of the People ” mean to you? 

It is a potent theme in the 21st Century because it rests with us, the people, to wrest back our power to shape the world we want – fairness to people who need help, economic policies that support all our lives on earth with the other inhabitants, and thoughtful inclusive policies for education and healthcare.

 

 

What dance group or dance style are you most looking forward to seeing this coming year in the parade? 

The Native American Circle Dance that will open the parade reclaiming Mannahatta for the Lenape peoples. Dance, prayer, true thoughtful beauty – can’t beat that.

 

 

 

If you could choose a Grand Marshal for this year’s parade….who would it be? 

Michelle Obama has done so much to address physical fitness with her Let’s Move Initiative when she was First Lady. Just check out this video with the So You Think You Can Dance All Stars! (as Rebecca whips up this video on her phone…)

 

If you could pick another country to hold a Dance Parade and Festival….which would it be? 

Most certainly another country, one with deep rooted culture like Mexico or India — It would be fun to share other world cultures with them.

 

Working for a non profit organization can at times be daunting and frustrating with limited personnel and funding….what is it that keeps you coming back for more and more? 

It’s family. There are the regulars and it is great to work with the team each year and see our family of photographers turn up on Parade Day. But I’ve noticed that all the new volunteers all have a special magic that makes them fit right in and feel like we’ve known the all along. Then it’s those enthusiastic, brilliant dancers – movement artists – who are all sublime!

Dance Parade is excited to welcome Disney’s Aladdin to the Dance Parade!

The movie will be released May 24th and is a a thrilling and vibrant live-action adaptation of Disney’s animated classic, “Aladdin”–  an exciting tale of the charming street rat Aladdin, the courageous and self-determined Princess Jasmine and the Genie who may be the key to their future.

Directed by Guy Ritchie (“Sherlock Holmes,” “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.”), who brings his singular flair for fast-paced, visceral action to the fictitious port city of Agrabah, “Aladdin” is written by John August (“Dark Shadows,” “Big Fish”) and Ritchie based on Disney’s “Aladdin.”

 

The film stars Will Smith (“Ali,” “Men in Black”) as the larger-than-life Genie; Mena Massoud (“Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan”) as the charming scoundrel Aladdin; Naomi Scott (“Power Rangers”) as Jasmine, the beautiful, self-determined princess; Marwan Kenzari (“Murder on the Orient Express”) as Jafar, the powerful sorcerer; Navid Negahban (“Legion”) as the Sultan concerned with his daughter’s future; Nasim Pedrad (“Saturday Night Live”) as Dalia, Princess Jasmine’s free-spirited best friend and confidante; Billy Magnussen (“Into the Woods”) as the handsome and arrogant suitor Prince Anders; and Numan Acar (“The Great Wall”) as Hakim, Jafar’s right-hand man and captain of the palace guards.

 

Naomi Scott as Jasmine and Mena Massoud as Aladdin in Disney’s live-action adaptation of ALADDIN, directed by Guy Ritchie.

Eight-time Academy Award®-winning composer Alan Menken (“Beauty and the Beast,” “The Little Mermaid”) provides the score, which includes new recordings of the original songs written by Menken and Oscar-winning lyricists Howard Ashman (“Little Shop of Horrors”) and Tim Rice (“The Lion King”) and includes two new songs written by Menken and Oscar and Tony Award®-winning songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (“La La Land,” “Dear Evan Hansen”).

 

Aladdin (Mena Massoud) meets the larger-than-life blue Genie (Will Smith) in Disney’s live-action adaptation ALADDIN, directed by Guy Ritchie.

 

Mena Massoud as the street rat with a heart of gold, Aladdin, and Will Smith as the larger-than-life Genie in Disney’s ALADDIN, directed by Guy Ritchie.

Share on Social Media:

Facebook: @DisneyAladdin

Twitter: @DisneyAladdin

Instagram: @DisneyAladdin

Hashtag: #Aladdin

 

In each issue of our STEPS! Newsletter we try to cast the Spotlight on one of our awesome team members to find out more about where they came from and to suss out their connection to dance and supporting the Dance Parade team. In this issue, we put the spotlight on Mona Freeman.

Hi, Mona. Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk with us.

How did you first find out about Dance Parade?

I saw a posting on LinkedIN last year and was intrigued by the idea of a dance parade.

I love to create, direct and produce crowd pleasing entertainment and this seemed like a good match.

I sent a connection request to Greg Miller, the Executive Director of the nonprofit that produces Dance Parade, stating that I wanted to know more about the Dance Parade. However, I was not able to be a part of it in 2018.

This season, when the volunteer committee was looking for people to join, I answered the call!

 

 

What is your current role in Dance Parade New York?

I am on the Curation Committee, planning the Dance Festival which will take place in Tompkins Square Park following the parade. I am currently watching through videos of dance performances to decide where they will be placed in the festival. I will then be coordinating the groups who will be presented on the family stage. The family stage will be presenting most of the groups that are made up of youngsters. I have previously presented dozens of performances with a cast of hundreds of children as young as three years old through teens.

 

 

What is your favorite style of dance to watch? to participate in?

Musical Theater and Ballet. When I began my dance training, I was influenced by the Broadway show A Chorus Line and the movie The Turning Point. I’ve studied numerous forms of dance, but ballet is what keeps me coming back because there is always something new to achieve.

 

What is your dance background or interest in dance?

My first formal dance lesson was at the age of thirteen. I was a high school gymnast and joined a ballet class in order to supplement my skills. I soon realized that I enjoyed ballet far more than gymnastics. I studied Dance Education at New York University and established a private dance studio shortly after graduation. I directed and taught students three years old through adults in Ballet, Tap, Jazz for over three decades.

If you could share the stage with anyone in history famous or not, living or deceased, a trained dancer or not, performing a routine choreographed by yourself…who would it be?

Gene Kelly, he made it look effortless. I would dance with him in the ballet presented at the end of An American In Paris. It’s a classic and doesn’t need any improvement.

 

 

Last year we celebrated the repeal of the Cabaret Law with the theme “The Cabaret of Life” — What does this year’s theme “Movement of the People ” mean to you?

 

Dance has been a means of expression since the beginning of time. For some people it is a cultural experience, for others it is a social experience, and there are those who bring dance to the stage for artistic expression or purely to entertain. With Dance Parade New York, we celebrate all of these dancers.

 

What dance group or dance style are you most looking forward to seeing this coming year in the parade?

I am looking forward to seeing the community engagement groups who will be performing on the family stage.  With these programs in schools and community centers throughout NYC, these youngsters and senior citizens have been exposed to something new. They learn tangible skills in movement and expression as well as intangible ones like confidence and team building. The final project of being in the parade and festival brings all this together. Some of them may be involved in dancing for the first time, or possibly since a long time ago. This is a wonderful experience for them, I want to share their joy!

 

 

If you could choose a Grand Marshal for this year’s parade….who would it be?

I would choose Rhee Gold. He is a source of motivation and encouragement for dance teachers and studio owners in the private sector. Rhee’s mother was a dance teacher. Rhee and his twin brother Rennie grew up in that world. Thousands of students attend dance classes each week where they not only learn dance technique, they learn life’s lessons.

 

Working for a non profit organization can at times be daunting and frustrating with limited personnel and funding….what is it that keeps you coming back for more and more?

When you are working on something that has personal meaning for you, the struggle is worth the trouble. I support the mission of Dance Parade: to promote dance as an expressive and unifying art form by showcasing all forms of dance, educating the general public about the opportunities to experience dance, and celebrating diversity of dance in New York City by sponsoring a yearly city-wide dance parade and dance festival.

 

 

What pitch would you use to attract a new volunteer onto the Dance Parade team?

If you love dance and the unbridled freedom of dancing in the streets, you need to join us!

 

Thanks Mona–Folks who want to volunteer can click here to fill out our short form!